Two Trailheads Represent, Avoid Lions & Dragons, Feast At Old Brick Pit



The world has wondered what's become of the Trailheads––where have they been? The gang has been radio silent for weeks. What's up? Did the band of brothers disband, and if so, was Yoko involved?

No. We're still together but busy. Author/documentarian George is in Munich doing interviews for a project. Design god Brad is holding business meetings rather than hiking (what's wrong with him?). Roy is babysitting an army of workers making home improvements. And Steve is home battling Covid.

Excuses, excuses, excuses, excuses.


But two intrepid Trailheads answered the call as Guy and Patrick hiked the Silver Lake trail while Fio protected their perimeter from dragons, bears, and deadly snakes. While our bylaws require four Trailheads for an official hike, we didn't care. Someone has to represent, dammit! Also, we made a Trailheads

rule always to break the rules.


Silver Lake is a private oasis nestled in Brookhaven. This trail is not open to the public, but Guy forked over $75 to become a member, and we became legit. This act surprised us as Guy typically prefers to trespass. He is a bad boy, but we'll follow him anywhere. The paths at Silver Lake run along the beautiful lake that, while lovely, is not silver. None of the locals gave us the ol' stink eye as we hiked––they could see we belonged.


We met friendly folks (who we assume had forked over their $75) along the way, walking their dogs. One woman had a Rhodesian Ridgeback, a beautiful dog known as "the lion hunter." The pup was excellent at his job. We didn't encounter any lions on our hike. Not one.


We believe she mentioned her dog’s reputation because we looked shifty in our Trailheads-branded garb, putting Guy and Patrick on alert that she could release her hound at the slightest provocation. We said our goodbyes and took our leave. Quickly.


After hours of hiking and re-hiking the trails, we punched out and headed to lunch at Old Brick Pit Barbeque on Peachtree Industrial in Chamblee. Chances are, you've driven by this joint dozens of times. We highly suggest you drop in soon and taste the real deal.


Old Brick Pit has been around for over 40 years, cooking in a brick oven over hickory wood. There's no beef served here. Swine and chicken rule the roost. The smokehouse in the back perfumes the air with seductive wood aromas that will awaken your barbecue tapeworm (we all have one).


Guy and Patrick ordered combination plates: pulled pork, a pair of ribs, coleslaw, Brunswick Stew, a container of tangy vinegar-based barbecue sauce (it's an old family recipe, don't ask), and a couple of slices of white bread for clean-up work.


The pulled pork is solid–– tender, tasty, satisfying, and rib-sticking. The ribs have a savory bark, and the succulent meat falls off the bone. It's melt-in-your-mouth juicy. The slaw is meh, but the Brunswick Stew is a star attraction. It is a flavorful stew loaded with meat and corn deliciousness. Don't miss a bowl of this stuff.


There is a comfortable outdoor seating area, and the place attracts a vibrant lunch crowd. You order at the counter, and they prepare your food. You grab your grub and go hunch over your plate, shoveling. Forget your fancy white tablecloths or barbecue sauce sommeliers. OBPB ain't that kind of joint, pal.

Guy and Patrick stuffed their gobs and called it a day. The two Trailheads had done the deed, and we hope our compatriots get their priorities straight and join us on the path to truth and barbecue soon. They missed their brothers in boots.

Do yourself a favor and make an Old Brick Pit stop.


Rating: Four Ribs*






Old Brick Pit Barbeque

4805 Peachtree Rd

Chamblee GA 30341

oldbrickpitbbq.com

(770) 986-7727



*About Our Barbecue Rating System


Trailheads do not claim to be food experts, epicureans, or sophisticated palettes. We are hungry hikers who attack a selected barbecue venue and ravage our way through whatever smoked fare and fixings they're dishing.

Our reviews feature what we believe are the highlights of the menu we sampled. So our intent is not to trash talk the saintly folks who tend to smoldering smokers on hot, humid summer days. They are sacrificing themselves in the noble art of smoking meats and feeding the drooling masses. Many are independent entrepreneurs who are the backbone of this humming American economy.

Now that you know our standards, you may wonder why every barbecue place gets a four ribs rating. The answer is easy: our group has acclaimed designers, and they think the ribs graphic looks cool.

Who are we to argue? Enjoy.


1 comment